Sunday, May 21, 2017
Polls apart, but the Tories and Labour both pose risks to the economy
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

maycorbyn.jpg

My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

This election is turning out to be a bit more interesting than I was expecting although, unless the polls are spectacularly wrong, though they are narrowing, it is still unlikely to be much of a whodunnit.

It is interesting because, for the first time in a very long time – perhaps since Michael Foot in 1983 – nobody, not even the Tories, has had to speculate about what dark, left-wing ideas lurk behind a bland Labour programme.

This time, instead, the left-wing ideas are in full view. Labour has produced a manifesto in the image of its leader, which means that a fascinating experiment is now unfolding. There has always been a strand of Labour opinion which holds that the party has suffered electorally, most notably under Ed Miliband two years ago, from not being left-wing enough.

Now that proposition is being tested, though sadly it will not settle the issue. If Labour’s vote share is in the low 30s, similar or better than Miliband in 2015 (30.4%), it will be greeted as progress, with alleged media bias against Jeremy Corbyn blamed for the message not fully getting through.

There are, as with all manifestos, good and bad ideas in Labour’s proposals. A National Transformation Fund, which would take advantage of low borrowing costs to invest an additional £250bn in Britain’s infrastructure over the next 10 years, has a lot to be said for it.

Though the arguments are not as strong as they were, there is also an argument for Labour’s National Investment Bank and its proposed network of regional development banks, which would draw on private finance to generate £250bn of what Labour calls “lending power”, operating in the gaps left by the commercial banks, particularly in small business lending. Calls for such an institution, modelled on European lines, go back a very long way.

(More...)
Sunday, May 14, 2017
Our nation of borrowers is storing up trouble
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

creditcards.jpg

My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

The governor of the central bank was perfectly clear. High and rising household debt “has made the economy less resilient to future shocks”. It is more likely that, in future, households will respond to an economic shock, or a rise in interest rates, by cutting their spending more sharply than in the past.

“Double-digit growth in debt … at a time of weak income growth cannot be strengthening the resilience of our economy,” he added.

This was not, for once, Mark Carney, but his Australian counterpart, Philip Lowe, governor of Australia’s Reserve Bank, in a speech a few days ago to the Economic Society of Australia, but the parallels with Britain are close.

The good news is that we are not alone in the vulnerabilities and challenges that high levels of household debt, alongside high house prices, pose. The bad news is that household debt in Britain, £1.53 trillion on Bank of England figures, higher on other measures, is higher in relation to income than in most other countries, as are house prices.

The Bank, for its part, has expressed its concern over the rapid growth in consumer credit, currently rising by more than 10% a year, its fastest since before the financial crisis. In its latest inflation report, published on Thursday, the Bank noted that the Prudential Regulation Authority is looking into whether credit quality is suffering, while the Financial Conduct Authority is examining assessments by lenders of the creditworthiness of borrowers.

Figures on Friday from the Finance and Leasing Association showed £5bn of car finance – new and used – in March, up 14% on a year earlier. Over the past 12 months, consumer car finance has totalled £32.6bn. Though this sharply rising debt is mainly on the books of finance companies and the motor industry, with 86.5% of new cars bought with finance it represents a significant monthly payments’ burden for households.

The bigger picture is what high levels of household debt mean for the stability of the economy and, for central bankers, whether they tie their hands when it comes to future interest rate hikes.

The numbers, for Britain, are striking. In the 1980s, after credit controls were abolished as part of a wave of financial liberalisation, concerns were expressed over high levels of household borrowing. Back then, however, we were merely in the foothills. Household debt in 1987 was £185bn. Including both mortgage and non-mortgage borrowing. Thirty years on it is more than eight times that, and has trebled relative to incomes.

(More...)
Sunday, May 07, 2017
Ultra-low rates made us lose our productivity mojo
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

prdy3.jpg

My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

There have been times in the past when voters were entitled to be nervous about interest rates in the run-up to a general election, because of the fear that nasty surprises would be on the way after polling day.

So, in the six months after Margaret Thatcher’s May 1979 victory, interest rates rose by no less than five percentage points (from 12% to 17%), while in the year after her 1983 victory they went up from 10% to 12%. In 1987, rates went up a couple of months after the election, though only briefly.

Before the May 1997 election the Bank, in the person of Eddie George, had been agitating for higher rates, without success. The task of raising them after the election initially fell to Gordon Brown – the last chancellor to raise rates – before being handed over to the newly independent Bank of England. There were six rate rises in the 12 months or so after May 1997.

It is fair to say that few are on tenterhooks this time. Under independence, the interest rate and electoral cycles have not been aligned. In 2001 the monetary policy committee (MPC) was cutting rates before the election and carried on afterwards. In 2005 the MPC held off a rate cut until after polling day. The 2010 election was held with Bank rate at a then record low of 0.5% and it stayed there for the whole five years of the following parliament.

Not only that, but the Bank has shown little inclination to budge from its new record low for official interest rates of 0.25%. It will put flesh on the bone of its intentions with an interest rate decision and new inflation report in one of its periodic “super” Thursdays this week.

But, while one MPC member, Kristin Forbes, has voted for a hike in rates and another, Michael Saunders, recently set out the arguments for doing so, it would be a big surprise if a rate hike happened this week or, indeed, if the Bank signalled its intention of moving on rates in the coming months. Forbes has one more MPC meeting after this one before she steps down.

The markets do not expect a rate hike until 2019 – the 10th anniversary of the move to ultra low interest rates – and some have not given up on the idea of a further rate cut, even from 0.25%, if the economic going gets tougher.

(More...)
Sunday, April 30, 2017
Vive La France - and an economy that's finally on the up
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

frenchflag.jpg

My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

It is not something I recall every saying before, but sometimes other countries’ elections are more interesting than our own. Theresa May’s regal progress towards endorsement by voters of what the Tories keep calling her “strong and stable” leadership seems unlikely to set the pulse rating.

When the most interesting question about the election is how badly the Labour party will do, and when many long-serving MPs have decided that their time is up, mainly Labour but also long-serving Tories such as the Treasury committee chairman Andrew Tyrie, this is no cliffhanger.

Across the channel in France, however, it really is interesting. Though Emmanuel Macron, a political ingénue, is clear favourite to beat Marine Le Pen, who was National Front leader but has temporarily stepped aside from that role, there is much more uncertainty about that outcome than there is about a May victory.

The uncertainty, meanwhile, will not end there. French parliamentary elections, on June 11 and 18, will come after Britain’s June 8 election. The starting point for them is that Macron’s En Marche! movement has no parliamentary representation and the National Front has only two out of 577 National Assembly members.

The conventional view is that, apart from these political hurdles, the next French president will face an uphill struggle in transforming a sclerotic, high-unemployment French economy into something competitive. Le Pen would try to do so via immigration and protectionism, probably pull out of the euro and replace it with the franc and offer French voters a referendum on Frexit. Good luck with that.

Macron, the more likely winner, though with health warnings attached, would relax labour laws, reduce business taxes, reform a system which he says preserves high unemployment and reduce the size of the public sector. In most respects his policies are a paler version of those of the failed conservative candidate Francois Fillon. He would also embrace closer European integration. Good luck with that too.

France does indeed need reforms but its economy is far from the basket case that it is often portrayed as in Britain. Economic growth, according to the purchasing managers’ index, which measures business-to-business activity, is at its strongest for six years.

(More...)
Sunday, April 23, 2017
Hard decisions will be ducked in this Brexit election
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

ballotbox2.jpg

My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

It is hard to think it was only two years ago. Then, in the run-up to the 2015 election, it was important to dig into the economic policy agenda offered by Ed Miliband and Ed Balls for Labour, and contrast it with David Cameron and George Osborne’s for the Tories.

Labour’s plans included, for those who have forgotten, no plan for a budget surplus but instead continuing to borrow to invest (in practice about £90bn more debt by 2020 according to the Institute for Fiscal Studies), but alongside a “budget responsibility lock”, bringing back the 50% top rate of tax and a mansion tax.

Apart from the fact that it looks as if we will end up with something like the fiscal numbers set out by Labour two years ago, and not the budget surplus promised by the Tories, so much has changed). We did not get the 50% tax rate or the mansion tax, though some say Osborne’s stamp duty reforms were worse.

And, as we head into another election, which even tests the appetite of an enthusiast like me, the rules of the game have been transformed. So far has Labour moved away from the political mainstream, and so distant is the main opposition party from returning to government, that it is not worth spending time on its economic plans.

The shadow chancellor could propose a 100% tax rate on anybody with two pennies to rub together and we could still relax in the knowledge that it is never going to happen. In all the time I have been writing about these things, there has never been anything quite like this.

The other rule-breaker, and for similar reasons, is that governments usually seek to ensure that voters are nicely buttered up in time for a general election, and feeling confident about the future. But consumer confidence, while a little higher than immediately after last summer’s referendum, is 10 points lower than it was in April 2015.

(More...)
Sunday, April 16, 2017
Pay hit again by the shrinking pound in your pocket
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

Fivers.jpg

My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

The squeeze is back. Real wages have stopped growing in Britain, a few months earlier than expected, thanks to the combination of rising inflation and sluggish pay growth.

After just over two years in which households appeared to have put the financial crisis behind them, and average earnings comfortably outstripped the rise in prices, a couple of years in which real wages fall is in prospect. Regular pay rose by just 0.1% in the year to the December-February period, and that tiny rise looks to be the last for a while.

The first and prolonged fall in real wages from mid-2008 to the autumn of 2014 was directly attributable to the crisis. It was the mechanism by which living standards fell to reflect Britain’s permanent loss of gross domestic product; the lost growth that will never be recovered.

This second fall in real wages reflects two things. Weak oil and commodity prices provided the basis for the recovery in real incomes from autumn of 2014, with the plunge in oil prices from $110 a barrel in mid-2014 to below $30 a barrel in early 2016. The partial recovery from that fall has been one factor pushing up inflation.

The other is sterling’s Brexit-related drop. The pound’s fall, which was the direct result of last summer’s referendum result, and to the Theresa May’s approach to the negotiations – no single market and no customs union – is now the factor coming through most strongly in the inflation figures.

One way of measuring the sterling effect is the difference between Britain’s inflation rate last month, 2.3%, and that in the eurozone, 1.5%. That difference will grow in coming months as inflation in Britain heads towards and possibly above 3%.

(More...)
Sunday, April 02, 2017
The inscrutable in pursuit of a softer Brexit
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

maybrexit2.jpg

My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

If you were looking for single word description of our prime minister it would be inscrutable. Her ability to pad away difficult questions with non-answers rivals that of Geoff Boycott. When it comes to inscrutability, the Great Sphinx of Giza has nothing on her.

It would be unwise therefore to read too much into the tone of her letter on Wednesday to Donald Tusk, the European Council president, invoking Article 50. Perhaps, apart from an eye-catching link between trade and security co-operation, which nobody in Europe seems to have much minded, she was just being polite.

But, having warned myself off, I will read something into it anyway. It is that, having talked the language of hard Brexit over the past nine months, not least to convince the Brexiteers in her party that she as a Remainer could be trusted, she is now embarking on a softer and more pragmatic course.

The hard Brexit language – no single market, no full membership of the customs union, reflecting the will of the people on EU migration, no deal is better than a bad deal – will still be wheeled out from time to time.

But it is now possible to see something softer emerging, assuming it can be negotiated and is acceptable to the other members of the EU, the so-called EU27.

What would this kind of softer Brexit entail? In talking to businesses, I have always seen it as including the following. It would involve, not single market membership but a comprehensive trade deal with the EU. Britain would have no influence on drawing up single market rules and directives, as May has conceded, but, except in the few cases where they are inappropriate or irrelevant, British business would still abide by the rules of our biggest market.

There would also be lengthy transitional arrangements, providing for a gradual adjustment for business to a post-Brexit world, as the prime minister has hinted. Nobody with any sense should have any problem with this. There were transitional arrangements stretching for at least eight years when Britain joined the European Economic Community in 1973. If they were appropriate on the way in, they are even more suitable on the way out.

(More...)
Sunday, March 26, 2017
Upbeat manufacturers and the drag from rising costs
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

shipstorm.jpg

My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

They are the two sides of the same pound coin. Sterling’s sharp post-referendum fall has pushed inflation above the 2% target and is squeezing household incomes but it is also providing a boon for exporters.

Ben Broadbent, one of the Bank of England’s deputy governors, pointed out in a speech on Thursday that the weaker pound boosted export prices, in sterling terms, by 12% during the course of last year.

Though the pound has perked up a little in recent days that effects, which as Broadbent says “will have significantly boosted exporters’ profitability” is still coming through.

No part of the economy is more exposed to these conflicting effects than manufacturing. For manufacturers, 2.3% inflation – the latest reading for the consumer prices index – is child’s play. They have seen a 19.1% rise in raw material and fuel costs over the past year.

They are also, it is clear, benefiting from the upturn in exports as a result of the weak pound. The latest CBI industrial trends survey, published last week, showed export order books at their healthiest since December 2013, with total order books close to a two-year high and output expectations buoyant.

Surveys by the EEF, the engineering employers’ federation, which represents manufacturers, have shown a similar strong picture, as have recent official figures. The surveys show that industry’s optimism is tempered by its concern over sharply rising costs, but that there is optimism nonetheless.

(More...)