Sunday, March 19, 2017
After the U-turn - thank the self-employed for Britain's jobs' miracle
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

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My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

It might be an age thing but the pace of life these days can be dizzying. There was a time when budgets rarely unravelled, and even bad and unpopular measures were seen through to the bitter end. Then, more recently, they started unravelling, but not usually for a few weeks.

Now Philip Hammond has set something of a record, though not of his own making, by dropping his main budget tax-raising measure, the 2 percentage point increase in Class 4 national insurance contributions (Nics) within a week.
Though I argued last week against this tax hike on the self-employed, I am not going to crow about the U-turn. The chancellor has enough enemies. He and the Treasury will take comfort from the argument that they were trying to do the right thing by the public finances and the tax system; correcting important unfairness in the latter. They will argue that politics got in the way of good economics.

I am not sure about that. The Nics’ increase is dead, for this parliament at least, so is water under the bridge. But the review that Theresa May commissioned from Matthew Taylor, chief executive of the Royal Society of Arts, will still be published in the autumn and could recommend enhanced rights for the self-employed. Taylor backed the increase in Nics though said it should not go any further.

The rise in self-employment has been a key contributor to the employment “miracle” in Britain in recent years. Without it, we would have seen a decent post-crisis jobs’ recovery. With the growing army of the self-employed, we have seen a record employment rates, and an unemployment rate, 4.7%, which equals the lowest since the mid-1970s.


The question is whether, once you start to tamper with the self-employment model we have in Britain, which is less-regulated, lower-taxed and on average lower-waged than employment, you kill it off. Has the self-employment boom, in other words, only been possible because of the existing model?

Looking at the numbers, there are 4.8m self-employed people in Britain, 3.44m of them full-time self-employed and 1.37m part-timers. The increase in the number of self-employed people in the past eight years, 1m, compares with a rise of 500,000 in the eight years leading up to the crisis. Without it, the employment rate would be closer to 72% than the current 74.6% record, and unemployment near to 2.5m, or nearly 7.5% of the workforce, instead of 1.6m and 4.7%.

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Sunday, March 12, 2017
Now, more than ever, we need productivity to move up through the gears
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

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My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

When it comes to budgets, there are some eternal verities. One is the contrast between the picture of the economy painted by the chancellor and the reality of the numbers. Another is the ability of chancellors to get into political hot water even when apparently treading with the utmost care.

George Osborne managed to do so a year ago when trying not to frighten the horses ahead of the referendum. Philip Hammond has followed his predecessor into the mire by announcing increases in Class 4 national insurance contributions for the self-employed and cutting the dividend tax allowance from £5,000 to £2,000.

In the speech the chancellor lauded the “entrepreneurs and innovators” who are the lifeblood of the economy and said he wanted Britain to be the best place in the world to start and grow a business. But fine words butter no parsnips for those facing these tax hikes.

I do not want to dwell on Hammond’s NI problem and his breaking of what was not a very sensible manifesto promise; no government should tie its hands by ruling out increases in the major taxes. But suffice it to say that the contributory principle, which he used to justify raising the contributions of the self-employed, has worn rather thin in recent years.

And, while tax neutrality is a laudable aim, the implicit understanding has always been that the self-employed deserve to be cut some slack because their incomes are less secure and because they do not enjoy the employment rights of the employed. The £500m a year the NI increases will bring in when fully in place could have been secured in other ways, notably by a modest increase in fuel duty, which would probably have been more palatable to white van man. In net terms, after other NI changes, they will bring in only £145m a year.

Not only that, but if you really wanted to tackle the discrepancies in the system – the chancellor cited a £32,000 employee attracting £6,170 of NI contributions and a self-employed person on the same income just £2,300 – you would address the biggest source of that discrepancy, which is that employers pay 13.5% contributions for their employees, but not self-employed contractors.

Anyway, no doubt this will all come out in the wash in the autumn. The Treasury seems determined not to U-turn on the NI increase, though we have heard that at this stage before.

What I did want to focus on was the big disappointment in the budget, the fact that the government’s fiscal watchdog, the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR), sees virtually no follow-through from the recent better performance of both the budget deficit and growth.

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Sunday, March 05, 2017
Better news - but look before you leap, Phil
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

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My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

Philip Hammond would rather he did not have to present a budget this week. We know that because, in November, he told us so. The spring budget, he said, had outlived its usefulness, providing chancellors with more opportunities to tinker than is healthy. In future, there will be a single budget in the autumn.

His reluctance may also be because, not for the first time, great things are expected within Theresa May’s government, and probably on Tory backbenches, of this final spring budget. The chancellor is expected to apply some hefty sticking plaster to the social care crisis, ease the burden of business rate changes for the hardest hit firms and provide one or two crowd pleasers for households squeezed by the rise in inflation. There is a bigger demand on him, which is to ameliorate the pressure on low-income and vulnerable households from spending cuts.

For the Treasury, this week’s budget carries an added danger. Had the books been closed for a year in November, when Hammond presented his autumn statement, the Treasury would have had little difficulty fending off demands for largesse.

At the time, the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) unveiled a cumulative, like-for-like increase in public borrowing of £114bn by 2020-21, compared with its projections last March, mainly due to weaker actual and potential economic growth, and its resulting impact on tax revenues and spending. There was also a smaller effect from deliberate policy actions; mainly increased capital spending by the chancellor. The OBR wiped away George Osborne’s ambitions of achieving a budget surplus; under Hammond there would still be a deficit of nearly £21bn in 2020-21.

There was an even bigger addition to government debt, up £210bn by 2020-21 to £1,950bn. Debt was predicted to rise by more than the increase in borrowing because the Bank of England’s term funding scheme for the banks counts as an addition to debt.

Since then, however, as a result of methodological changes, stronger economic growth than feared and reasonably healthy revenues, the position has improved. The picture unveiled by the OBR this week will be better than it expected in November, with an upgrading of growth and a downgrading of public borrowing, though still considerably worse than it was projecting a year ago.

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Sunday, February 26, 2017
This nation of shoppers needs a new growth model
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

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My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

Every little bit of information adds to our knowledge, and changes our perceptions. In recent days we have had a flurry of such information from the official statisticians. Let me try today to steer through it, and try to answer some key questions about the outlook.

The questions are these. Can the consumer continue to be the mainstay for the economy during 2017? Will imports and exports respond to the weak pound? Are businesses already throttling back on investment and will they continue to do so?

There is another question, and it is whether Britain can move away from a growth model which depends excessively on consumer spending to something more sustainable. The London School of Economics’ Growth Commission, whose first report four years ago was very good, published a second report on last week. More in a moment on whether it has some of the answers.

Starting with those statistics, the second release of gross domestic product figures for the final quarter of last year were rather bitter-sweet. They confirmed the expected upward revision of growth to 0.7% for the quarter, which is above-trend, but they also showed a surprise downward revision of growth from 2016 as a whole from 2% to 1.8%.

Amid the uncertainty of last year, 1.8% growth was perfectly respectable, exceeding most of the G7, though just below Germany. But it was driven, to an almost embarrassing extent, by consumer spending.

While the economy grew by 1.8%, consumer spending rose by 3.1%. The consumer, in fact, accounted for all of Britain’s growth last year and a little more, 1.9 percentage points. Government spending also contributed 0.2 points of growth. The circle is squared by the fact that business investment fell, subtracting 0.1 points from growth, and that net trade, exports minus imports, also acted as a drag on growth, to the tune of 0.4 percentage points. Investment and export-led growth it was not.

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Sunday, February 19, 2017
Our Goldilocks job market and its three lurking bears
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

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My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

There is some news we should make a point of celebrating. The announcement a few days ago that Britain’s employment rate hit a record high of 74.6% in the final three months of last year was a good example.

What the figure meant was that in records dating back to 1971, there has never been a higher proportion of 16-64 year-olds in work. Though the records go back only 46 years, I doubt there has been a time in Britain’s history when the employment rate has been higher.

Britain’s employment rate is not only the highest on record but is around five percentage points higher than that of America and some seven percentage points above the European Union average. Among advanced economies, only Denmark, Sweden, Germany and Japan have higher employment rates. At the other end of the scale, Italy has an employment rate of 57.6%, Greece just 53%.

Think about that record for a second. Over the period since 1971 very many more young people stay in full-time education beyond the age of 16, which in normal circumstances ought to mean a decline in the 16-64 employment rate, even allowing for the fact that many students have part-time jobs.

Until recently, there was also a significant erosion of employment among older age groups. Many is the piece I have written over the years about declining employment in the 50-64 age group. The employment rate in that age group in currently just below 71%, up from 69% two years ago. And these days a different phenomenon is at work. On top of 16-64 employment, there are 1.2m people aged 65 and over in work. That may not be an all-time record but it is close to recent highs and underscores the labour market’s success.

The record employment rate is, first and foremost, a reflection of the welcome flexibility of Britain’s labour market, a flexibility which is reflected in the fact that what is now the Cinderella measure of unemployment, the claimant count, is at 745,000 in January, lower than the number of officially-record vacancies, 751,000. If that has ever happened before, it has not done so for a very long time.

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Sunday, February 12, 2017
Spending down, taxes up - but we will keep on borrowing
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

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My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

The Institute for Fiscal Studies has been producing its “green” budget for 35 years, through changing economic and political circumstances. The latest, the final one (for now) at this time of year because Philip Hammond is moving the budget timetable to the autumn, is a bit of a humdinger.

The IFS pulls few punches in laying out the scale of Britain’s fiscal challenge, leaving me a little punch-drunk. Seven years after the start of post-crisis deficit reduction, the budget deficit is 4th largest, relative to gross domestic product, of 28 advanced economies. Public sector debt, on the same basis, is 6th largest among the same group of advanced countries. It has not been higher relative to GDP since the mid-1960s, when the post-war unwinding of debt was still in full swing.

This is despite a fall in real-terms public spending of 10% since 2009-10, the longest and biggest on record, with more to come. By 2019-20, on present plans, real departmental spending will be 13% lower than in 2009-10.

For every Scylla, meanwhile, there is a Charybdis. With £17bn of tax rises planned for the rest of this parliament, the tax burden will rise to more than 37% of GDP by the end of the parliament, its highest since 1986-7, when the Thatcher government was in the process of aggressively reducing income and corporate taxes. Even then, we will still have a budget deficit.

I have always adopted a “something will turn up” approach to the public finances. In the past, time and economic growth proved to be great healers. In the 1980s, economic revival turned a budget deficit of 4.3% of GDP into a surplus within eight years. In the 1990s the timetable was even shorter. Britain went from a 6.7% of GDP deficit to a budget surplus in just five years.

This time the challenge was greater, with a deficit of 10.1% of GDP in 2009-10. Progress has been made. The latest full-year deficit, for 2015-16, was 4% of GDP. But that is still high, as is this year’s projected deficit of 3.5% of GDP. As the IFS points out, in the 60 years before 2008, Britain has run a bigger deficit in only 13 years, mainly when the economy was in recession.

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Sunday, February 05, 2017
Basic income, an old idea whose time has not come - until the robots take over
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

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My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

Sometimes ideas that have been around for a long time suddenly build up a he
ad of steam. So it is with one such idea at the moment, that of a universal basic income, an unconditional payment to every individual in the country, regardless of their circumstances.

A universal basic income (UBI) was last week endorsed by the Indian government’s 2016-17 economic survey, as “a powerful idea …. whose time is ripe for serious discussion” and which would be more effective than the existing system of state benefits.

A trial of the system began at the start of this year in Finland, and there are plans for similar trials in Fife and Glasgow in Scotland. It is part of the policy platform of Benoit Hamon, the French Socialist presidential candidate, admittedly a very long shot for the Elysee Palace. It was part of the Green party’s manifesto in the 2015 general election. Groups like the Citizen’s Income Trust have been advocating it for years.

UBI attracts some strange bedfellows. Though usually associated these days with the political left, it has sparked the interest of Silicon Valley tech entrepreneurs. In the 1960s both Milton Friedman and Martin Luther King advocated versions of it as, more recently, has the libertarian Charles Murray, who has written extensively for this newspaper. Friedrich von Hayek, beloved of Margaret Thatcher, though this was one of his ideas she did not take up, also favoured a guaranteed minimum income.

Why is the basic income idea, sometimes known as a guaranteed or citizen’s income, having been around a very long time, gaining new interest now? There are two main reasons.

One is the rise of what Professor Guy Standing of SOAS (The School of Oriental and African Studies) has described as the rise of the “precariat”. Standing, who presented his arguments at this year’s Davos world economic forum, describes the precariat as the “many millions of people experiencing a precarious existence, in temporary jobs, doing short-time labour, linked strangely to employment agencies, and so on, most without any assurance of state benefits or the perks being received by the salariat or the core.”

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Sunday, January 29, 2017
Smooth so far - but plenty of Brexit bumps on the road ahead
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

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My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

The scores are in, and they show that Britain’s economy held up very well in the second half of last year, in the aftermath of the vote to leave the EU. I and many others expected weaker growth, and we have yet to see it.

Right to the last, with the 0.6% rise in gross domestic product (GDP) in the fourth quarter reported by the Office for National Statistics on Friday, the numbers surprised on the upside. The expectation was 0.5%.

And, while last year’s growth rate was the weakest for three years, it was the strongest in the G7, and far better than the overwhelming majority of economists expected in the immediate aftermath of the referendum.

The figures are a vindication for those who said that, while the medium and long-term consequences of Brexit would be significant, the impact on growth in 2016 would be negligible. This was the conclusion, for example, of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (Niesr), in a May 2016 article, The Short-Term Impact of Leaving the EU.

The Treasury, which has a close relationship with Niesr, should have taken a leaf out of its book, though it was under political direction. GDP is the best overall measure of economic activity, though it has its critics and often fails to tell the full story.

The story we have is that in the final quarter of 2016, and indeed in the second half of the year. Buoyant consumer demand led to strong growth in the dominant service sector of the economy. That the service sector is dominant – its output in the final quarter was 1.8% up on the April-June quarter – was a good thing. Had we relied on manufacturing, overall industrial production, construction or agriculture, the economy would be in the doldrums. All ended 2016 with lower output than in the second quarter.

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